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Youth Programs
Mental Health
Substance Use
Youth Programs
Mental Health
Substance Use

Flu Shot’s Available at Summit/Seneca and Shoreline

Get Your Flu Shot

We have flu shots available at our Summit/Seneca and Shoreline primary care clinics. You can sign up ahead of time with our Dispensary Nurses or with Front Desk Staff. On the day of your appointment please check in with the Front Desk.

Summit/Seneca Flu Shot Dates

  • Wednesday, October 7
  • Monday, October 19

Shoreline Flu Shot Dates

  • Friday, October 9
  • Tuesday, October 20

You may also get a flu shot during regular Primary Care hours: 7:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Visit HERE to learn more about why you should consider getting a flu shot.

The need for a focus on suicide prevention is not new. The statistics are clear: any one of us can be affected by suicide either personally or through someone we know. Emotional, situational, health and financial stress or pressures certainly enhance the likelihood for a person to experience depression, anxiety, or a sense of hopelessness leading to thoughts of self-harm. This is even more of a concern in 2020. 

We are faced with the concurrent realities of COVID-19, forest fires and social unrest – all of which have had the effect of increasing factors known to contribute to suicidal thoughts and actions. As we consider Suicide Prevention during the month of September, it is critical we recognize that we – our community – our neighbors – our children – our parents, are experiencing a tremendous amount of situational stress.  We must find creative ways to manage our own stress and to support those around us when our usual coping activities may not be available due to smoke, physical distancing, or closure of our gathering places.  

Research has shown that social connection is one of the most powerful protective factors preventing suicide. While we do need to take care not to spread the COVID-19 virus or to be exposed to unhealthy levels of smoke, we have the ability to socialize wearing masks, get together in physically distanced small groups, use social media or the telephone to connect with those we find supportive or who we believe may be vulnerable. If we are feeling optimistic, it is helpful to share that with the people we are close to as well as strangers we may interact with briefly. If we are struggling, it is healthy to tell someone who will listen or to reach out to someone through a crisis line. If we or someone we know has a mental health or substance use treatment need, resources are available if we ask. Together, we will get through these trying times. 

  • If you are in crisis, you can call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at 800-273-8255. Press 1 for the Veterans Helpline.
  • You could also get help by texting “HEAL” to the Crisis Text Line at 741741 or contacting Lifeline Crisis Chat.
  • If you’re under 21, you can call Teen Link at 866-TEENLINK (866-833-6546) and ask to talk to a peer. The phone line is open 6 p.m.– 10 p.m. and chat is available 6 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. daily.

If you are interested in connecting to a THS counselor, please click HERE to fill out our GET HELP FORM.

Individual Impact: 

  • 75% of all people who die by suicide are male.    
  • Although more women than men attempt suicide, men are nearly 4x  more likely to die by suicide.  
  • Suicide is the 2nd leading cause of death for people ages 10-34 and the 4th leading cause of death for people 35-54      
  • The overall suicide rate in the U.S. has increased by 31% since 2001  
  • 46% of people who die by suicide had a diagnosed mental health condition  
  • While half of individuals who die by suicide have a diagnosed mental health condition, research shows that 90% experienced symptoms.

Community Impact: 

  • In 2017, suicide was:
    • the second leading cause of death for American Indian/Alaska Natives between the ages of 10-34.
    • the second leading cause of death for African Americans, ages 15-24.
    • the leading cause of death for Asian Americans, ages 15-24.
    • the second leading cause of death for Hispanic people in the U.S., ages 15-34. 
  • American Indian/Alaska Native adults die by suicide at a rate 20% higher than non-Hispanic white adults.  
  • Lesbian, gay and bisexual youth are four times more likely to attempt suicide than straight youth.  
  • Transgender people are 12 times more likely to attempt suicide than the general population.  
  • 10% of young adults say they experienced suicidal thoughts in the past year.   
Are You or Someone You Know in Need of Treatment?
Click the button for more to be taken to our Get Help form. Your entry will be securely transmitted to our staff who will contact you ASAP.

The Kent branch is experiencing a power outage due to the windy weather. The branch is closed today, 09/08/2020, due to this power outage.

The First Step to Recovery at THS starts with an assessment, a private consultation with one of our counselors talking about the issues the new patient is facing. Here our staff can figure out exactly what issues someone is coping with. Whether it’s heroin or opioid abuse, mental health issues, or trouble with other substances, our team is standing by to help anyone take their First Step to Recovery. Watch the video above or read below to learn more.

Learning How We Can Help

Recognizing you should seek treatment is hard and our team at Therapeutic Health Services understands that. We want to make it easy to get care and start recovery. For each of our patients, whether they are seeking substance use treatment or mental health care, the first step to recovery starts with an assessment.

Prospective patients have a private conversation with one of our counselors, explaining what troubles they’re facing and what they need help with. If substance use is a concern, the counselor will ask questions about the patient’s history of substance use, how much they use and how often. They will also ask about how substance use is impacting the rest of the patient’s life.

If the patient is seeking mental health services, they may be asked about how they’re feeling, what’s troubling them and if they have concerns about anxiety, anger, depression or other mental health issues. They will be asked other questions about their support system, their life experiences and how their mental health issues are impacting their ability to function. Our goal to make sure we know where they’re coming from so we can address their unique needs

If the patient is entering our Opioid Use Treatment program, they’ll have an appointment with one of our healthcare providers who will determine what kind of medication and dose amount will be right for the patient. These medications may include methadone or Buprenorphine, otherwise known as Suboxone®.

These questions and our intake process are important to helping our team get a good idea of who the patient is and how THS can help. We can then assign the patient to a counselor who will take them through to the next step of recovery.

Our goal at Therapeutic Health Services is to help each of our patients take their first step toward recovery, getting started right for a journey of healing and wellness.

Take the First Step to Recovery
Click the button below to be taken to our Get Help form. Your entry will be securely transmitted to our staff who will contact you ASAP.

Here at Therapeutic Health Services, our doors are still open and we will continue to serve any and all in need of behavioral health services. However, many of our patients won’t be coming in as often. They will continue to get weekly check-in calls from their counselor, more details on these check-ins are HERE. We recognize people might face some mental health challenges, so here are some great self-care tips for helping each of us manage our own feelings throughout this time of physical distance.

Self-Care Tips

  1. Take care of our physical body. Prioritize sleep, plan for healthy meals, stay hydrated, and move your body daily.
  2. Seek out safe and responsible ways to maintain a connection with others. Phone calls, Zoom, and FaceTime with family and friends can help sustain social needs when you’re isolating.
  3. Be intentional about how much time we spend watching the news. Constant exposure can be overwhelming and increase our stress.
  4. Stay informed through reputable sources and avoid sources of misinformation or hyperbole that only increase television or web ratings. Our staff are monitoring resources like the CDC and WHO for updates.
  5. Remember to acknowledge our personal feelings about the current situation. Our feelings are valid and deserve our attention. It is important that we find ways to manage these so that we are still able to function well, otherwise, we will not be able to help ourselves or others. This is a time to reach out to our personal and professional supports to process our reactions to what is happening around us.
  6. Take breaks. This current situation is more like a marathon than a sprint. We will burn out and be unable to sustain ourselves or our work if we push ourselves too hard early in this pandemic. We need to conserve for the weeks and months ahead.
  7. Infuse joy into our daily life. Make time every day for something on the lighter side, reading a good book, binge-watching a tv show, playing with our kids, challenging older relatives to a game via an app, or snuggling our pets. Plan fun or silly activities after work to take relieve pressure and give our minds rest. Allow ourselves to be present during the activity and truly enjoy whatever we choose to do.
  8. Focus on what we can control and practice mindfulness. When thoughts spiral about the future or anxieties about the situation, mindfulness can bring us back to the here and now. Sometimes having a plan for how we will deal with potential problems can reduce our anxiety about what might happen.
  9. Knowing when to ask for help and having the strength to reach out is important for all of us. Examples might be: seeking mental health support, game planning work issues with our supervisor, or getting assistance caring for kids who are home from school.
  10. Shifting our focus to the things in our lives that we are grateful for can turn a day completely around. The more we attend to the positives in our lives the less daunting the difficulties of our work or the fear related to this pandemic will feel.
  11. Separate the challenges you feel you’re facing and divide them into the things you can control and those you can’t. Take one of the things you can control and think of one little habit you can do to help you manage this challenge.
  12. Keep a journal, just take a few minutes a day to jot down how you’re feeling, how your day went, what challenges you’re facing and what goals you have. Trying noting three things you were most grateful for that day.

Self-Care Resources for the “New Normal”

  • Despite the crisis, the doors at THS are still open and we will help anyone we can who needs behavioral health support. Visit our Get Help Page here to be connected with care and support.
  • Use free meditation apps. to reduce anxiety, improve sleep, and even decrease experiences of physical pain. Popular options include Headspace, Insight Timer, and Calm. Each of these have free versions, and Headspace is offering free access to their full version for all healthcare workers. Just provide some basic information including your NPI number to access the full version for free.
  • Exercise for free at home. There are countless apps, websites, and YouTube channels dedicated to exercise from yoga to dance to kickboxing to strength training. Often these can be done without any equipment at all, and even services that typically charge are waiving fees. If we attended a local gym that is closed, they may be posting exercise opportunities online to keep their client base engaged.
  • Access cultural resources and events online.
  • If you have a video game system, go get lost in some of the great stories and worlds designers have built, like these especially bundled for staying at home
  • Town Hall Seattle plans to live stream some of the previously scheduled programs on it’s website
  • Met Opera is offering free nightly streaming
  • Many museums across America and around the world are offering virtual tours, including the National Museum of Natural History, the Louvre, the Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art, and this collection of Natural History museums around the world.
  • Follow your favorite musical artists to see when they offer free online live shows, NPR has a great list here. Our check out this list from Billboard.com
  • 211 remains operational and is getting up to date information about the situation and resources to support individuals and families. This is not just a resource for our clients! You can access this resource by calling 211 or going to their website 211.org.​

Check Out Our Other New Posts

Information taken from SAMSHA flyer:
HHS Publication No. SMA14-4885 (2014)

What You Should Know

When you hear, read, or watch news about an outbreak of an infectious disease such as Ebola, you may feel anxious and show signs of stress—even when the outbreak affects people far from where you live and you are at low or no risk of getting sick. These signs of stress are normal, and may be more likely or pronounced in people with loved ones in parts of the world affected by the outbreak. In the wake of an infectious disease outbreak, monitor your own physical and mental health. Know the signs of stress in yourself and your loved ones. Know how to relieve stress, and know when to get help.

Know the Signs of Stress

What follows are behavioral, physical, emotional, and cognitive responses that are all common signs of anxiety and stress. You may notice some of them after you learn about an infectious disease outbreak.

Your Behavior:

  • An increase or decrease in your energy and activity levels
  • An increase in your alcohol, tobacco use, or use of illegal drugs
  • An increase in irritability, with outbursts of anger and frequent arguing
  • Having trouble relaxing or sleeping
  • Crying frequently
  • Worrying excessively
  • Wanting to be alone most of the time
  • Blaming other people for everything
  • Having difficulty communicating or listening
  • Having difficulty giving or accepting help
  • Inability to feel pleasure or have fun

Your Body:

  • Having stomachaches or diarrhea
  • Having headaches and other pains
  • Losing your appetite or eating too much
  • Sweating or having chills
  • Getting tremors or muscle twitches
  • Being easily startled

Your Emotions:

  • Being anxious or fearful
  • Feeling depressed
  • Feeling guilty
  • Feeling angry
  • Feeling heroic, euphoric, or invulnerable
  • Not caring about anything
  • Feeling overwhelmed by sadness

Your Thinking:

  • Having trouble remembering things
  • Feeling confused
  • Having trouble thinking clearly and concentrating
  • Having difficulty making decisions

Know When To Get Help

You may experience serious distress when you hear about an infectious disease outbreak, even if you are at little or no risk of getting sick. If you or someone you know shows signs of stress (see list at left) for several days or weeks, get help by accessing one of the resources at the end of this tip sheet. Contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline right away if you or someone you know threatens to hurt or kill him- or herself or someone else, or talks or writes about death, dying, or suicide.

Know How To Relieve Stress

You can manage and alleviate your stress by taking time to take care of yourself

Keep Things in Perspective:

Set limits on how much time you spend reading or watching news about the outbreak. You will want to stay up to date on news of the outbreak, particularly if you have loved ones in places where many people have gotten sick. But make sure to take time away from the news to focus on things in your life that are going well and that you can control.

Get the Facts:

Find people and resources you can depend on for accurate health information. Learn from them about the outbreak and how you can protect yourself against illness, if you are at risk. You may turn to your family doctor, a state or local health department, U.S. government agencies, or an international organization. Check out the sidebar on the next page for links to good sources of information about infectious disease outbreaks.

Keep Yourself Healthy:

  • Eat healthy foods, and drink water.
  • Avoid excessive amounts of caffeine and alcohol.
  • Do not use tobacco or illegal drugs.
  • Get enough sleep and rest.
  • Get physical exercise.

Toll-Free: 1-877-SAMHSA-7 (1-877-726-4727) | Info@samhsa.hhs.gov | https://store.samhsa.gov

Use Practical Ways to Relax:

  • Relax your body often by doing things that work for you—take deep breaths, stretch, meditate, wash your face and hands, or engage in pleasurable hobbies.
  • Pace yourself between stressful activities, and do a fun thing after a hard task.
  • Use time off to relax—eat a good meal, read, listen to music, take a bath, or talk to family.
  • Talk about your feelings to loved ones and friends often.

Pay Attention To:

  • Recognize and heed early warning signs of stress.
  • Recognize how your own past experiences affect your way of thinking and feeling about this event, and think of how you handled your thoughts, emotions, and behavior around past events.
  • Know that feeling stressed, depressed, guilty, or angry is common after an event like an infectious disease outbreak, even when it does not directly threaten you.
  • Connect with others who may be experiencing stress about the outbreak. Talk about your feelings about the outbreak, share reliable health information, and enjoy conversation unrelated to the outbreak, to remind yourself of the many important and positive things in your lives.
  • Take time to renew your spirit through meditation, prayer, or helping others in need.

Information taken from SAMSHA flyer:
HHS Publication No. SMA14-4885 (2014)

Do You Need Treatment or Services?
Click the button below to be connected to our Get Help form. From there we can connect you to care with our qualified clinicians and compassionate staff.

During the coronavirus|covid-19 pandemic we want to minimize the risk of exposure and infection for our patients and staff. At the same time, we know you, like everyone else, are anxious, afraid and depressed. We want to continue to provide you with the recovery support you need and help you feel connected at this extraordinary time.

Beginning Wednesday, March 25 your counselor will be making weekly check-in calls to you via the phone number we have listed in your patient record.

Make Sure We Have the Right Number

If you need to update your phone number, please call the main number of If you need to update your phone number, please call the main number of your clinic location (click here to go to our “Locations” page) and our staff will update your patient record.

Take the Call

The call from your counselor may appear as “blocked” or “private.” If you do not answer the counselor will leave a message for you.

Schedule a Phone Appointment

You can make an appointment for a telephone check-in by calling the main number of your clinic. Phone numbers for each location are on our Locations page here. When you call, press “0” to speak to a front desk person who will schedule a time for your counselor to give you a call.

Be safe and stay well!

Stay Up-to-date on Our Response to the Coronavirus (Covid-19) Outbreak
These are uncertain times and news about the outbreak is constantly changing, but you don’t have to worry about what THS is doing, how our services are impacted and what effect that has on your care. Click the button below to go to our THS Service Updates – Coronavirus (Covid-19) page. We’re including all updates to care at THS on this page, along with what we’re doing to preserve the health and safety of our patients.

Therapeutic Health Services cares deeply about the health of our patients and of our community. We will be posting information as needed regarding any changes in program and service delivery at THS related to coronavirus (covid-19). Our goal is to keep our patients safe and provide the care they need. Please remember to watch our website’s Services Updates page (https://ths-wa.org/news-events/ths-service-updates-coronavirus-covid-19/) page for any changes in service. We will post on our website if there are any changes to daily dosing.

Temperatures

All patients and staff must have their temperature checked upon entering the building. All individuals with a fever or other symptoms will be provided a mask and will receive their dose individually in an alternate office. If you feel sick in the morning before you come to the clinic, please call ahead and notify our staff so you can receive instructions for when you arrive at the clinic. We will make sure our staff are ready to receive you and  ensure you get your medication safely. The branch phone numbers are listed here and on our Google Business listings.

Social Distancing

To protect everyone, all patients and staff are requested to observe a social distance of six feet. For patients in line waiting to receive medication, we have marked out the distance to stand apart on the floor at each of our locations.

Medication

In this uncertain and rapidly changing time, we want all of our medication-assisted treatment (MAT) patients to know that they will receive their medication. Our medical staff are evaluating patients for temporary or increased carries.  Please follow any instructions given by nursing staff when you receive your medication.

All MAT Patients, please remember to bring your lock box to the clinic on your next visit.

Please remember to watch our website’s News & Events (https://ths-wa.org/news-events/) page for any changes in service. We will post on our website if there are any changes to daily dosing.

Emergency or Crisis Help

If you are experiencing a medical or other emergency, Call 911 immediately.

If you are in crisis and need help you can call the King County Crisis Line at  206-461-3222or 1-866-4CRISIS (1-866-427-4747).

In Snohomish County, please call 2-1-1 or the Care Crisis Line at 1-800-584-3578 to get help.

Stay Up-to-date on Our Response to the Coronavirus (Covid-19) Outbreak
These are uncertain times and news about the outbreak is constantly changing, but you don’t have to worry about what THS is doing, how our services are impacted and what effect that has on your care. Click the button below to go to our THS Service Updates – Coronavirus (Covid-19) page. We’re including all updates to care at THS on this page, along with what we’re doing to preserve the health and safety of our patients.

Therapeutic Health Services cares deeply about our patients and our community, that’s why we want to share this notification and any others in the future to keep you informed of any changes at THS regarding coronavirus (covid-19). Our goal is to keep our patients safe and provide the care they need.

MAT Dosing at our Branches

Daily dosing will continue until further notice. We urge patients to please follow dosing line instructions and be aware they may be screened prior to dosing. We will keep you updated on any developments affecting care at THS.

Please remember to watch our website’s Services Updates page (https://ths-wa.org/news-events/ths-service-updates-coronavirus-covid-19/) page for any changes in service. We will post on our website if there are any changes to daily dosing.

Symptoms

Symptoms for the coronavirus include the following:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath

If you experiencing these symptoms, we recommend visiting your primary care provider.

Prevention

A screenshot of a cell phone  Description automatically generated

These are important ways to prevent infection:

  • Wash hands with water and soap/hand sanitizer for 20 seconds
  • Avoid contact with infected people
  • Don’t touch eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands

Emergency or Crisis Help

If you are experiencing a medical or other emergency, Call 911 immediately.

If you are in crisis and need help you can call the King County Crisis Line at  206-461-3222 or 1-866-4CRISIS (1-866-427-4747).

In Snohomish County, please call 2-1-1 or the Care Crisis Line at 1-800-584-3578 to get help.

Questions or Concerns

If you have questions or concerns, please contact your branch. Our locations and their phone numbers are found here.

Stay Up-to-date on Our Response to the Coronavirus (Covid-19) Outbreak
These are uncertain times and news about the outbreak is constantly changing, but you don’t have to worry about what THS is doing, how our services are impacted and what effect that has on your care. Click the button below to go to our THS Service Updates – Coronavirus (Covid-19) page. We’re including all updates to care at THS on this page, along with what we’re doing to preserve the health and safety of our patients.

By Benedict Carey
Reposted from New York Times
Feb. 25, 2020

For years, Claire Bien, a research associate at Yale, strained to manage the gossipy, mocking voices in her head and the ominous sense that other people were plotting against her. Told she had a psychotic disorder, she learned over time to manage her voices and fears with a lot of psychotherapy and, periodically, medication. But sometime in late 1990, she tried something entirely different: She began generating her own voices, internal allies, to counter her internal abusers.

“I truly felt I was channeling my father, my ancestors, a wise psychiatrist, giving me advice,” said Ms. Bien, who has written a book about her experience, “Hearing Voices, Living Fully.”

She added: “Recovery for me means knowing that my mind is my own, and even when it doesn’t feel that way, I know it’s only temporary. Knowing that allows me to hold a job — a good job — and be productive, respected and even admired by the people with whom I work.”

Mental-health researchers have numerous scales to track symptom relief, like the easing of depression during talk therapy, for instance, or the blunting of psychotic delusions on medication.

But the field has a much harder time predicting, or even describing, what comes next. How do peoples’ lives change once they have learned to address their symptoms? Mental disorders are often recurrent, and treatment only partially effective. What does real recovery — if that’s the right word — actually look like, and how can it be assessed?

This is what people in the thick of mental distress desperately want to know, and a pair of articles in a recent issue of the journal Psychiatric Services shows why good answers are so hard to come by.

In one, the first study of its kind, Dutch researchers tested a standard life-quality measure, the Recovery Assessment Scale, that is typically used to rate an individual’s confidence, hope, sense of purpose, willingness to ask for help, and other features of a full, stable life.

The team administered the 24-item questionnaire to three groups of people: one with a diagnosis of a psychotic disorder, like schizophrenia; the siblings of members of this first group, who had no such diagnosis; and a control group of unrelated people who had no history of mental-health problems. The scale found little detectable differences between the groups.

The widely used R.A.S., as the scale is known, is “of questionable usefulness,” the authors concluded. If everyone looks roughly the same on the scale, then how can the scale be used to measure improvement?

In the other paper, an editorial, Larry Davidson, a psychiatric researcher at Yale, pointed out that the results were not surprising. The researchers had intentionally left out a subset of R.A.S. queries that probably mattered most, involving how well respondents were managing their symptoms — statements like “Coping with mental illness is no longer the main focus of my life” and “My symptoms interfere less and less with my life.”

By taking out these questions, Dr. Davidson said, the study demonstrated only that, in the absence of mental distress, “the everyday lives of people with a mental diagnosis are just like everyone else’s.” The authors, however, noted that those questions were excluded because, by definition, the comparison groups had no symptoms.

In effect, both parties agree: The R.A.S., and many similar scales, amount to little more than symptom checklists, in the end not much different from those used to track the short-term effects of a drug. The field could use different, and better, means of assessing how people shake off or learn to manage a mental-health diagnosis.

The scales originated decades ago with mental-health consumers, or “survivors,” who saw the usual clinical definitions of symptoms relief, like the Hamilton Depression Scale, as unable to capture the fullness of personal recovery.

The scale analyzed in the Dutch study, for instance, asks people to rate, on a scale of 1 to 5, how strongly they agree with various statements like, “If people knew me, they would like me,” “If I keep trying, I will continue to get better” and “It’s important to have healthy habits.” Researchers rely on scales like this to gauge the longer-term, real-world effects of all variety of mental-health programs, like group therapy for rape victims in the Democratic Republic of Congo or community outreach for psychosis in Wisconsin.

But as the new study finds, questions like these are applicable to anyone, with a diagnosis or not; not to mention that responses can vary by the day, or even the hour, depending on what insults or encouragements hold sway in the moment.

People who find a way to move on with their lives after receiving a psychiatric diagnosis — depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia — generally must do so the hard way: gradually, by fine-tuning some combination of personal rituals, social connections, work demands, therapy and, when necessary, medications. And these idiosyncratic regimens of self-care are not easily captured by the measures currently available to researchers.

Now, given the clear limits of the R.A.S. and other quality-of-life measures, some experts say it is time to find ways to better assess how a person’s daily experience changes in the months and years after receiving a mental-health diagnosis. “Personal recovery,” Dr. Davidson wrote, “has as much to do with the quality of a person’s sense of identity and belonging to a community as it does to subjective experiences of mental illness per se.” He argues that the field needs to develop reliable tools to assess what it’s like to live with mental distress over time, in the same way that cardiology and other branches of medicine use “patient-reported outcomes” to track longer-term responses to treatment.

Gail Hornstein, a professor emerita of psychology at Mount Holyoke College, has been tracking a group of more than 100 people who attend or have attended meetings of the Hearing Voices Network, a grass-roots, Alcoholics Anonymous-like group where people talk with one another about their mental distress and possible ways of managing it.

Most people in the study have a diagnosis of a psychotic disorder, like schizophrenia, and consider their experience in the groups to have been supportive, even transformative. But many still hear voices, and sometimes reassuring ones, Dr. Hornstein said in an email. So assessing improvement by asking the usual kinds of questions — for instance, “Are the voices gone?” — isn’t necessarily useful.

Instead, Dr. Hornstein asks whether the voices — like those that Ms. Bien still occasionally encounters — or other aspects of an individual’s life have changed as a result of participating in the groups.

People’s responses are extremely varied, Dr. Hornstein said in a phone interview. They might say, “I have a different relationship with my voices now.” Or, “My voices used to bully me, and terrify me; now I have relationship with them based on mutual respect.”

“That’s a change, for the better — it’s improvement,” Dr. Hornstein said: “But you wouldn’t pick it up unless you knew how to ask.”

Reposted from New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/25/health/mental-health-depression-recovery.html

Get Your Flu Shot

Flu Shot’s Available at Summit/Seneca and Shoreline

We have flu shots available at our Summit/Seneca and Shoreline primary care clinics. You can sign up ahead of time with our Dispensary Nurses or with Front Desk Staff. On the day of your appointment please check in with the Front Desk. Summit/Seneca Flu Shot Dates Wednesday, October 7 Monday, October 19 Shoreline Flu Shot Dates Friday, October 9 Tuesday, October 20 You may also get a flu shot during regular Primary Care hours: 7:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Visit more..

an image of hope, standing on mountain sunrise suicide prevention

September is National Suicide Prevention Month

The need for a focus on suicide prevention is not new. The statistics are clear: any one of us can be affected by suicide either personally or through someone we know. Emotional, situational, health and financial stress or pressures certainly enhance the likelihood for a person to experience depression, anxiety, or a sense of hopelessness leading to thoughts of self-harm. This is even more of a concern in 2020.  We are faced with the concurrent realities of COVID-19, forest fires more..

Kent Power Outage

Kent Power Outage Closure – 09/08/2020

The Kent branch is experiencing a power outage due to the windy weather. The branch is closed today, 09/08/2020, due to this power outage.

First Step to Recovery

First Step to Recovery

The First Step to Recovery at THS starts with an assessment, a private consultation with one of our counselors talking about the issues the new patient is facing. Here our staff can figure out exactly what issues someone is coping with. Whether it’s heroin or opioid abuse, mental health issues, or trouble with other substances, our team is standing by to help anyone take their First Step to Recovery. Watch the video above or read below to learn more. Learning more..

Banner showing a dock stretching out into a mountain lake with the sun and text with the title of the page, Self-Care Amidst Coronavirus (Covid-19)

Self-Care Tips for Coping Amidst Coronavirus (Covid-19)

Here at Therapeutic Health Services, our doors are still open and we will continue to serve any and all in need of behavioral health services. However, many of our patients won’t be coming in as often. They will continue to get weekly check-in calls from their counselor, more details on these check-ins are HERE. We recognize people might face some mental health challenges, so here are some great self-care tips for helping each of us manage our own feelings throughout more..

Woman with hands to face in depression or anxiety

Coping With Stress During Infectious Disease Outbreaks

Information taken from SAMSHA flyer: HHS Publication No. SMA14-4885 (2014) What You Should Know When you hear, read, or watch news about an outbreak of an infectious disease such as Ebola, you may feel anxious and show signs of stress—even when the outbreak affects people far from where you live and you are at low or no risk of getting sick. These signs of stress are normal, and may be more likely or pronounced in people with loved ones in more..

woman answering phone call

Weekly Check-Ins By Phone

During the coronavirus|covid-19 pandemic we want to minimize the risk of exposure and infection for our patients and staff. At the same time, we know you, like everyone else, are anxious, afraid and depressed. We want to continue to provide you with the recovery support you need and help you feel connected at this extraordinary time. Beginning Wednesday, March 25 your counselor will be making weekly check-in calls to you via the phone number we have listed in your patient record. Make more..

Checking temps flyer

New Procedures for Protecting Health and Ensuring Safety

Therapeutic Health Services cares deeply about the health of our patients and of our community. We will be posting information as needed regarding any changes in program and service delivery at THS related to coronavirus (covid-19). Our goal is to keep our patients safe and provide the care they need. Please remember to watch our website’s Services Updates page (https://ths-wa.org/news-events/ths-service-updates-coronavirus-covid-19/) page for any changes in service. We will post on our website if there are any changes to daily dosing. more..

THS Coronavirus Patient Info Card

We Care About Your Health – Coronavirus (Covid-19)

Therapeutic Health Services cares deeply about our patients and our community, that’s why we want to share this notification and any others in the future to keep you informed of any changes at THS regarding coronavirus (covid-19). Our goal is to keep our patients safe and provide the care they need. MAT Dosing at our Branches Daily dosing will continue until further notice. We urge patients to please follow dosing line instructions and be aware they may be screened prior more..

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